Home     About Us    Contact Us     Contribute     Privacy
Investing
Stocks
Bonds
Mutual Funds
Biz
Credit
Career
College
Economics
Tax
More
 
 
Marketplace
Related Definitions
Related Categories
Tip of the Day

Tip of the Day Seek Professional Help

Seek Professional Help - For most of us our days are busy enough and trying to plan an investment strategy is beyond our means of understand or our time requirements....

read entire tip

Recently Added
Other Great Sites
 

Investing Glossary - B

    Baby Bells

    Baby Bells - baby bells is a name originated from the break up of AT&T, the United States telephone company which split into smaller companies in 1984. The split was to make the telephone industry more completive. At the initial break up the Baby bells included the following: Nynex in New York, and the New England area, Ameritech, Bell South, and Bell Atlantic in the Midwest, South Western Bell, US West, and Pacific Telesis in California, and Nevada.  Since 1984 these companies have merged, split, or been sold to other companies...

    Back-End Load

    Back-end load - A back-end load is a fee such as a sales charge or a commission, which investors pay when selling their mutual funds within a certain number of years, which is usually 5 or 10 years. The fee will be a percentage of the value that is being sold. The back-end load will be the highest the first year and continually decreases until the period expires and the fee is no longer charged. Back-end loads accompany Class B shares. Class A shares have front-end loads and Class C shares are said to be level loads neither carrying a...

    Back Away

    Back Away - A back away means to withhold or withdraw, which means to remove money from the account or to retract what was being offered, a previously quoted interest in the sale or purchase of equity. Equity in this case could consist of common stock, preferred stocks, real estate, futures trading account, brokerage account or any other assets included in the company's total equity, minus any liabilities....

    Backgrounder

    Backgrounder - a backgrounder is a document which contains the history of company, or a specific product...  The information in the backgrounder contain financial information, lists key personnel, goods and service information, a mission statement , and the company’s objectives The backgrounder is usually brief, and is a basic summary of the company, its  current position, history, and objectives, all summarized in an orderly fashion.  A backgrounder can either be written or verbal and its purpose is attempted to regain interests from outside parties in order to sell goods or service, or to lure investors....

    Backing Away

    Backing Away - Backing away means to withhold, remove, or withdraw interest on a valid offer of a valid bid on any given security when the quantity and price are accurate. This is commonly done by brokers and dealers, although each time this happens, and the dealer or broker backs away, they are assuming the risk of violating the regulations laid our by NASD that oversee this action type. Penalties could be severe, so taking this type of action is not recommended....

    Back Up

    Back Up - A back up is to reverse a trend in the stock market. This means that investors, who have had a recent increase in share prices are suddenly met with declining returns, might possibly tell you that the stock market has backed up, by changing the previous market trend....

    Bait and Switch

    Bait and Switch – a bait and switch is a term used to describe a certain deceptive sales tactic.  A bait and switch is where a certain product is advertised , and when the customers inquires about it, the consumer is directed to a more expensive item, by disbarring the sale item, and attempting to sell him/her on a higher value item.  The sale item was never the target item to sell, it was just to bait the customer, and get him interested, and then the consumer is talked into purchasing a more expensive item  ...

    Baked In The Cake

    Baked In The Cake - Baked in the cake means is a quote used to describe information that is influential such as unconfirmed news reports, unconfirmed company's information, or projected company or stock earnings, which are already included in the current stock's market price. By doing this, some attempt to use the information to tip the scales on the market and change other investors behaviors, put others off purchasing or selling certain stocks. If nothing happens and things remain the same, this information is valueless....

    Balanced Fund

    Definition: A mutual fund that is heavily diversified because it invests in an extremely large number of stocks and bonds.  They also frequently invest in other investments such as bonds and cash. TeenAnalyst Advice: If you're looking for greater diversification, consider a balanced fund.  In years where the stock market doesn't perform very well, they aren't as susceptible to large falls.  But, also, in years where the market is roaring, they tend to have lower rates of return.Balanced funds are also geared towards people seeking income from dividends and yields on the bonds in the portfolio.  So if one of your...

    Balance Sheet

    Definition: A balance sheet is a financial document that states the company's assets, liabilities, and stockholder's equity.  If you subtract the liabilities from the assets, you will have the company's net worth. TeenAnalyst Advice: Balance sheets are good documents to look at when researching a company.  You'll learn all kinds of information about the company, such as how much cash they have on hand, how much money they owe and when they owe it, and what their biggest assets are.It's great to compare the company's current balance sheet with its past balance sheets from the previous years.  It'll show you weather...

    Barefoot Pilgrim

    Barefoot Pilgrim - A barefoot pilgrim is an investor that has lost all the money they had invested in the stock market, usually due to a lack of knowledge where trading is concerned, as well as a lack of sophistication in understanding the trading that is taking place. Generally, this is equivalent to loosing one's shirt at the ponies, or loosing ones shoes at the casino, and normally involves making poor investment choices....

    Bargaining Unit

    Bargaining Unit – A bargaining unit is an organized group of employees represented by a labor union or other group for the purpose of collective decision making with a business or corporation. The major purpose of a bargaining unit is establish things such as wages, benefits, promotion opportunities and other employee benefits, like paid vacations and sick days. The bargaining unit also meets with management to settle employee disputes. There is only so much the 2 parties can agree on, and they can’t fall out of the guidelines of federal or state laws or civil rights....

    Barometer Stock

    Barometer Stock - A barometer stock is a bond or stock used to gauge the entire stock market's condition. This is also known as a bellwether and generally involves only one stock or bond that investors widely believe can be used as an accurate state of condition when it comes to the stock market, and how well it is doing. For example, everyone knows that the Fortune 500 companies are generally stable; therefore, sometimes investors base the stock market's condition on how well a specific and usually stable stock is doing....

    Base Market Value

    Base Market Value - The base market value is the real time value of a group of specific securities, at a particular time. This base market value of the group of securities is instrumental in determining the value of a stock market index, which is a statistical guideline that provides representation of a set value of the securities, which make the group. These are often used as benchmarks to measure economic or financial performance....

    Basic Earnings Per Share

    Basic Earnings Per Share - A basic earnings per share is the amount earned on each share of common stock. Earnings are just another word for net income and it operates no differently then when an individual does his/her income taxes, and has to arrive at his net income. Because in the accounting world, companies do income statements to measure gains and losses, the net income on the company's income statement is the very last line, also called net profit and/or net loss....

    Bearer Share

    Bearer Share - A bearer share is a stock certificate, which happens to be the property of whomever owns the stock certificate at the time, but no record of the ownership is maintained, or issued, by the company who issued the initial shares. A stock certificate is a document that reflects the legal ownership of a specific number of company shares in a corporation. In this instance, the certificate bears witness of ownership to the investor who holds the certificate in his possession....

    Bear Funds

    Bear Funds - Bear funds are funds that use short selling to quickly make a return, profit, when the market is in a ?Bear? position, which means the market is declining. These funds are usually mutual funds and hedge funds, used by wealthy people and institutions s they can use aggregate strategies, not available with mutual funds, to manage short stock indexes. You play both sides of the market so that returns in the bear funds offset losses elsewhere in the investor's portfolio....

    Bear Market

    Definition: A bear market is a market in which stocks are currently falling in value.  It's argued exactly how much a market has to fall in order to be considered a bear market, but 10% is typically seen as a good figure.  It got its name because a bear throws its paws down when it attacks. TeenAnalyst Advice: We don't really have any advice for bear markets.  Other than that history has proven that in the long-term, markets rebound and you can expect a positive return if you stick with a long-term approach.  So rather than panicking and selling all your...

    Bear Market Rally

    Bear Market Rally - A bear market rally is a rally of stock prices, which is experience after a long period of downward slides in the market. A bare market rally generally indicates the market is on the rebound and will soon be turning into a bull market again; however, this could also be a temporary condition. Because the market is so unstable and uncertain, is has also become known as a sucker rally, due to many people being sucked in to invest at the sign of the upward trend, only to see the market fall again after their purchase....

    Below Par

    Below Par - Below par is a stock or share that has a price that is below face value, which means the company that issued them has assigned a nominal dollar value to the security. Equity shares are usually the face value, a very small sum that bears no connection to the real market price, except for preferred stocks, in which the face value is used to arrive at the total payments earned in dividends....

    Benchmark Risk

    Benchmark risk - A benchmark risk is a measure of looking at all the different risks that could be involved that would affect the potential returns on the mutual fund by comparing it to the benchmark, (a standard such as NASDAQ) with which it is to be compared. Of course, we expect the mutual fund to be profitable. Not only are the actual returns important, the level of risk involved in generating the return is also important, and therefore there are also risk adjusted returns. Mutual fund risks are assessed using five different pointers. The five pointers are: Beta, Alpha,...

    Berkshire Hathaway

    Berkshire Hathaway - Berkshire Hathaway is a holding company specializing in insurance related companies, but it has a wide array of interests, which make it a conglomerate. Founded in 1939 as a textile manufacturer, but taking on its current platform back in 1967, it is recognized widely because of its CEO and investor Warren Buffett, who they called Oracle of Omaha, because Omaha, Nebraska is where its headquarters are located. This man was considered to be somewhat of a investment genius during his time as CEO, therefore under his guidance the company grew and prospered, plus has never stopped to...

    Bernie Madoff

    Bernie Madoff - Bernie Madoff is the former chairperson of the Nasdaq who was accused in 2008 of more than a $50 million dollar swindle from investors in the complex Ponzi Scheme. This scheme started to come undone in 2008 when the stock market dropped substantially and investors stated bulk withdrawal requests. Bernie Madoff in 2009 pleaded guilty and admitted to operating the largest fraud scheme in history by a single individual. This fraud scheme managed to take in many unsuspecting investors who didn't understand what was happening and was not aware of what had occurred at the time, but...

    Best Ask

    Best Ask - A best ask is the absolute lowest price any selling party, investor or dealer, has stated they are willing to accept at a specific time for a specific security or commodity. On over-the-counter stocks, the best ask is considered the best price quoted which the Market Maker, investor or dealer, will sell the stock for. On mutual funds a best ask is the sales charge plus net asset value. This is also called an asked price or offering price, or sometimes the asking price. This best ask price is a quoted price by the dealer or investor...

    Best Bid

    Best Bid - The best bid is absolute highest price any buyer has stated he/she is willing to pay at any specific time for a specific security. Best bids are part of the bonds, futures, mutual funds, stocks, trading and options. It should be noted that the difference between a best ask and a best bid being quoted through any Market Maker, which is also known as a broker, dealer, or investment firm, in a security is known as a inside quote. Money Makers continually quote offer prices and bid prices, by obligation, to guarantee a full sale of the...

    Beta

    Definition: The measure of a stock's volatility (systematic risk) relative to the market as a whole.Advice: The beta of a stock is calculated by running a regression analysis.  The result is a beta coefficient.  If the beta coefficient is 1, the stock tends to be as volatile as the stock market.  A beta greater than 1 means the stock is more volatile, while a beta less than 1 means it's less volatile.It's possible for stocks to have negative betas.  In this case, the stock tends to move in opposite directions than the market.  One example is Anheuser-Busch, which is though...

    Bid/Ask Spread

    Bid/Ask Spread - The bid/ask spread is in general the difference between any two prices; therefore, the difference between a current ask and a current bid, in over-the-counter trading of a given security is also called the bid/ask spread. In exchange trading, the difference between the current bid and the current offer is exactly the same thing, although occurring in a different segment of the market. The bid/ask spread is part of the mutual funds, bonds, futures, and stocks options and are generally active securities, but not always. Recently, single small investors have become concerned about the bid/ask spread and...

    Bid Price

    Definition: This is the highest price that someone is willing to pay to buy shares of stock.  This also means that this is the highest price you can expect to get for your shares of stock when selling them.  It is always lower than the ask price. TeenAnalyst Advice: Always look at the bid price before you sell your shares.  If the stock you're holding isn't very liquid (meaning that not many people buy and sell that stock), the bid price might be considerably lower than what the stock is quoted at.  So if you're holding a $15 stock, you might...

    Bid Size

    Bid Size - The bid size is the number of shares, which are offered for purchase at a specific bid price. This bid price is often expressed by the hundreds of shares, although traders have been known to use the ask size and the bed size to attempt to calculate any impending short-term increases and decreases pressures being felt on the stock's price. Although this can work amazingly well, occasionally, on the NYSE and AMEX, it is far less of a useful tool on the Nasdaq, which generally has Market Makers waiting to buy and sell shares, rather than market...

    Bid Wanted

    Bid Wanted - The bid wanted is a price request by a specific holder of a security who wants bid offers from other investors. Generally, this specific holder is seeking offers from other brokerages, brokers and dealers, as opposed to the public, in general. Usually bid wanted requests occur during active markets that are rising, or increasing, instead of active markets that are falling, or declining. The majority of bid wanted quotes are noted by BW on the stock market sheet, so that investors can readily identify the security and make offers on the specific security to the holder who...

    Big Bang

    Big Bang - A big bang occurs when there is sudden deregulation of any financial stock market, which was used regularly to describe the deregulation of the London, England based financial market way back on October 27 of 1986. This is almost like the May Day deregulation that occurred on May 1 of 1975, a date when fixed minimum commissions by brokerages where no longer to be in effect in the United States that, in turn, led to the discount broker industry, in the United States of America. These dates are well remembered by most investors....

    Big Board

    Big Board - A big board is the largest and the oldest United States Stock Exchange, which is in New York City on the famous Wall Street. This board is responsible for supervising member activities, setting policies, evaluating applicants, and overseeing transfers of member's seats. The big board opened in 1792 when a bunch of brokers met under a tree in Manhattan and agree to trade securities, after signing an agreement. Unlike modern exchanges, the big board still uses the trading floor to conduct all its transactions. On the floor, representatives of both sellers and buyers, known as brokers, meet...

    Big Figure

    Big Figure - The big figure is a security's price that is expressed using term of whole dollars, without including any cents or decimal values. An example of this would be: Let's say a certain security is actually trading at 130.996, but when being negotiated the value would be secured at 130, and the .966 decimal value would not be included in the value expressed. This is also often known as the handle. By doing it this way, it simplifies the process and rounds things off, although when buying the security the entire amount is included in the price, not...

    Big Uglies

    Big Uglies - Big Uglies is stock, which is offered by companies belonging to the industrial field, which are not often favored by investors. These stocks are generally in the steel and mining fields. These stocks are generally priced lower, than most other stocks, and normally are the hardest stocks to unload, or sell, when you wish to get rid of them. Although one should note, that these stocks appear to have a long investment life than the majority of other stocks, and because of this they attract investors when the market is suffering undue turmoil, because of this they...

    Black Friday

    Black Friday - Black Friday took place on September 24 in the year 1986. This was the day everyone, involved in the stock markets, remembers as the worst day of his or her life. On this day in stock market history, the markets crashed after a failed attempt by a group of financiers to try to corner the market in gold. This led to a major depression, which is a specific time period where business activity drops to an all time low, and in turn, creates skyrocketing unemployment rates and...

    Black Monday

    Black Monday - Black Monday took place on October 19 in the year 1987. On this day the DJIA, Dow Jones Industrial Average, fell 508 points, or 22%. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is the widest used indicator to gauge the overall condition of the stock market. This average is price-weighted based on 30 actively traded stocks, which are blue chip, and primarily industrial in nature. The Dow officially opened back in 1896 and was opened by a man named Charles Dow. The Dow has a price-weighted indexing system, as opposed to other markets that use a common market cap-weighted...

    Block Positioner

    Block Positioner - A block positioner is a member who is registered in the Securities and Exchange Commission, and who deals, sells, securities while taking a long or short position with stocks and bonds. A block positioner takes this stance with the hopes that he or she will net a hefty profit through selling the block for a much higher price that it was purchased for originally. Because of this, block positioners have been known, and often do, hedge or sell short, as a way to protect their investment in a certain stock or bond. This sometimes works very well...

    Black Swan

    Black Swan – the black swan is a term or phrase used to describe a rare event or something beyond the realm of normal expectations or reality.  The black swan phrase only applies to very large incidents or magnitude.  The term began back in 17 century Europe where it was assumed that all swans were white, so the black swan was a symbol of the impossible... The term “Black Swan” was made popular by Nassim Nicholas Taleb, a Wall Street trader and former professor... In the financial world a Black Swan is a usually random and UN expected event....

    Black Thursday

    Black Thursday - Black Thursday took place on October 24, in 1929 and is the most remembered day in stock market history. This is the day the stock market plummeted through the floor and was extremely unstable for many days. Inevitably, the stock market crash of Black Thursday led to the stock market crash of Black Tuesday, which was on October 29 of the year 1929 and resulted in a day that experienced the biggest percentage decrease in stock prices, which in turn, was considered to the instigator of the Great Depression....

    Black Tuesday

    Black Tuesday - Black Tuesday took place on October 29 in the year 1929 and was probably the most famous stock market crash ever to be remembered in stock market history. On this day, the stock market's stocks lost 13 percent of their value and due to this, it was considered to be the event that began the great depression, where hundreds of people were unemployed and suffered considerable hardships for the next few years that followed the stock market crash that occurred on Black Tuesday. Today, many of the...

    Blend Fund

    Blend Fund - A blend fund is a mutual fund that has assets composed of a combination of money market securities like bonds, stocks, and other securities, as opposed to just one, or maybe two, asset categories or classes. By purchasing blend fund securities, the investor is able to diversify his or her portfolio with a single fund, which makes the whole portfolio more stable. Although, since blended fund securities widely vary in composition it is hard to make educated guesses about the risk and performance levels, but they are less risky than stock mutual funds and more risky than...

    Blind Bid

    Blind Bid - A blind bid is an offer to buy a group of stocks, which have been bundled, without having knowledge of which stocks have been included in the bundle. Some portfolio managers improve their position in the stock market using this option, without having to influence the stocks that they are buying or selling. This Blind Bid type of investment can be extremely high risk for most investors, as they may receive a group of stocks, or a bundle, that in the end could turn out to be valueless to their portfolio. A gamble to say the very...

    Block Trade

    Block Trade - A block trade is a absolutely huge number of securities which are being traded, a minimum of at least ten thousand stock shares, or two hundred thousand dollars in bonds. It is only usually investors, institutional, who dare to undertake such large volume trades and it is known that Block Trades can influence the actual market price of any security, depending entirely on the liquidity of the market. Institutional investors usually include investment companies, brokerages, pension funds, investment banks, mutual funds, and endowment funds. These investors are assumed to much more knowledge; therefore, they are able to...

    Bloomberg

    Definition: Bloomberg is a global provider of financial news and is widely-known for its popular Bloomberg terminal and its television channel. Advice: Bloomberg has long had a presence on Wall Street as a provider of news and data.  Analysts, traders, and other Wall Street professionals use its terminals to quickly access and analyze financial news and data.  Its television channel is watched by millions throughout the world.Here's an image of what a Bloomberg terminal looks like:                                          ...

    Blue Chips

    Definition: Blue chip stocks are stocks of well-established companies.  These would be companies like Wal-Mart, McDonald's, and Gillette.  Investments in these stocks are typically considered more conservative.  They got their name from the blue chip in poker, which is considered the most expensive chip. TeenAnalyst Advice: Blue chips are good stocks to get started out with because we all know what these companies are and who their customers are.Every diversified portfolio should contain at least a few blue chip stocks in it.  The majority of these stocks will still be around 30 years from now, as compared to smaller companies whose...

    Blue Collar

    Blue Collar – the term blue collar is used to describe a certain type of employment.  Blue collar is a phrase used to describe non office or management works such as laborers, or factory workers.  Blue collar workers are generally hourly paid employees that do not perform office  or manangemtn duties. They generaly are skilled or non skilled workers perfoming genral labor work.  Blue collar workers are the opposite of the white collar workers, who are office or managemtn workers. And don’t normally perform manual labor..; the term arrived from the days when most labor uniforms were blue...

    Board of Advisors

    Board of Advisors - The board of advisors is a less rigid, or formal, alternative to a board of directors, which is commonly used, as opposed to the board of directors, in small companies. This board of advisors usually has from three to seven members on it. These members usually meet periodically to discuss how things are operating, ways to improve operations, and then they take the results of their discussions and findings and use that to advise the owner and management on which direction the company should proceed. The board of advisors assumes no legal responsibility for the operations...

    Board of Directors

    Board of Directors - A board of directors are individual people who are elected, in accordance with the company or corporation's charter, by the company or corporation's shareholders to oversee the corporation or company's management. The Board of Director's members, in a company or corporation, are usually paid in stock and/or cash, and they meet many times each year, usually monthly. The board of directors does assume legal responsibility for all corporate activities, which are also called directorates. The board of directors directorates are generally voted upon with a majority rule, set out in the company or corporation's charter specifying...

    Board of Trustees

    Board of Trustees - a board of trustees is a group of people who are responsible for overseeing a non stock company. A  Board of trustees is found in places like Universities, mutual fund companies, non profit organizations or mutual savings banks.  The board of trustees is elected by depositors, or investors, and is responsible for protecting the company’s assets, set rules, elects officers and set and enforces company policies...  Some companies and non profit organizations operate with just a board of trustees, and elect a chief trustee, instead of an officers or management....

    Bo Derek Stock

    Bo Derek Stock - Bo Derek stock is a word or phrase used to describe a stock that is perfect for most investors to invest in. The Bo Derek Stock became a term used widely in the stock market, during the 1980s, when the actress ?Bo Derek? played the part of a perfect woman in The Perfect 10, a movie that depicted what the perfect woman would be. This movie was created to show she could score a measure of 10, if she was the perfect woman, which is considered to be the best score one can achieve. Awe, you...

    Bolas De Madrid

    Bolas De Madrid - The Bolsa De Madrid is one of Spain's four regional stock exchanged and the Bolsa De Madrid carries four indicies that include the Ibex-35, which is known to be the largest of the four and is consists of the majority of the liquid Spanish stocks that are traded continually. The Bolsa De Madrid trades convertible bonds, fixed-income securities, government bonds, and stocks. The Bolsa De Madrid handles 90% of its bids using a Spanish Stock Market electronic interconnection system, which is known as a SIBE. This stock market opened in 1831, and since then has grown...

    Bolas Mexicana De Valores

    Bolas Mexicana De Valores - The Bolsa Mexicana De Valores is also known as the BMV, which is Mexico's only stock exchange; therefore, it is the primary one for Mexican investors. This exchange is a limited company under private ownership and only has authorized brokerage firms that each own one share. This exchange trades primarily in bonds, federal treasury certificates, stocks, mutual funds, promissory notes, and debentures - primarily in the debt instruments. In 1995, an electronic trading system was introduced that executes and monitors all debt market trades. The BMV has 13 indices it calculates for stock prices....

    Bolsa De Comercio De Santiago

    Bolsa De Comercio De Santiago - The Bolsa De Comercio De Santiago is the country of Chile's primary stock exchange. The Bolsa De Comercio De Santiago stock exchange is includes three market indices made up of the General Price Index, the Inter-10 Index, and the Selective Stock Price Index. This stock exchange originally opened back in 1893 and was made up of a selective group of joint stock companies, 329 to be exact, that were mainly focused on mining. The Bolsa De Comercio De Santiago stock exchange is also known as the SSE. Today, this market has grown significantly....

    Bolsa De Mercadorias & Futuros

    Bolsa De Mercadorias & Futuros - The Bolsa De Mercadorias & Futuros is also known as the BM&F, which is Brazil's most recognized Mercantile and Futures Exchange. The Bolsa De Mercadorias & Futuros Exchange deals in trades for many items that include gold futures, agricultural commodities, currency, and stock options. This exchange was formed when a series of mergers took place that combined the Sao Paulo Commodities Exchange, the Rio de Janeiro Brazilian Futures Exchange to form the Bolsa De Mercadorias & Futuros Exchange. Each time a merger took place; the exchange strengthened the domestic commodity market, and increased its...

    Bolsa De Valores De Sao Paulo

    Bolsa De Valores De Sao Paulo - The Bolsa De Valores De Sao Paulo is also known as the Bevespa and is Brazil's largest stock exchange located in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The Bolsa De Valores De Sao Paulo does all its trades using an electronic system, but allows verbal bids in the trading pit, or on the floor of the stock exchange. This market interconnects with other national and regional Brazilian exchanges and trades stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and much more. This market is recognized world wide as Bazil's major player in the stock exchange; therefore, this market handles a...

    Bolsas Y Mercados Espanoles

    Bolsas Y Mercados Espanoles - Bolsas Y Mercados Espanoles, also known as the BME, which is the Spanish company that was established to maintain and operate the Spanish Stock Exchanges. In 2008, the company operated four Spanish Stock Exchanges in Madrid, Bilbao, Barcelona, and Valencia. All of these stock exchanges deal in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and other security options. BME provides many services such as IPOs, initial public offering, and trades bonds, derivatives, stocks, and income securities that are fixed. The BME has been operating since 1856. Services are economic activities that are intangible and do not result in...

    Bombay Stock Exchange

    Bombay Stock Exchange - Bombay Stock Exchange is a really popular stock exchange which is located in the city of Mumbai, India. The Bombay Stock Exchange is the largest, based on market capitalization, in all of Southern Asia. The Bombay Stock Exchange trades stocks from approximately forty-seven hundred individual companies and the Bombay Stock Exchange is the biggest stock exchange in the world, at the present time. The Bombay Stock Exchange Sensex, is the main index that is used to track the performance of the stock market itself....

    Bond Fund

    Bond Fund - A bond fund is a mutual fund made of monies endowed in multiple of bonds or other debt securities. They are interest-bearing certificates that identifying a debt to a public or private corporation When you purchase a bond you are advancing money to the issuer, usually a company, for a specified length of time. Consider bonds to be more conventional than stocks, but the best portfolios contain a combination of investments appropriate to your goals. The investor earns more of a return, but takes a greater risk in that the company may lose money on its ventures...

    Bond Indexing

    Bond Indexing - Bond Indexing involves designing a portfolio consisting of fixed securities, fixed for income, so that a particular bond index benchmark is followed by the securities. Because bonds are considered a lower risk than stocks, it is wise to have many of these within your portfolio so that your portfolio is diversified with less risky investments. A benchmark is a standard that is used to compare; therefore a good example might be the Nasdaq as it is a good benchmark to the performance of how technology stocks compare. This comparison can then be used to decide which bonds...

    Bond Mutual Fund

    Bond Mutual Fund - Bond mutual funds often focus on a particular type of bond such as municipal bonds, other government bonds, or corporate bonds. Municipal bonds are not a matter of Federal income taxes. You can steer clear of state taxes if you pick a municipal bond fund with most of its holdings in your home state. This is a benefit advantage to investors. Bond funds are a critical part of a diversified portfolio, helping to diminish the overall risk of your investments. This is to help you understand how including...

    Bond Rating

    Definition: A rating that is given to a bond based on its probability of defaulting.Advice: A bond defaults when the issuing organization can no longer make its debt payments.  Because this is very bad for investors in those bonds, a rating agency is needed to assess this risk.The two most popular debt rating agencies are Moody's and Standard & Poor's.    ...

    Bonds

    Definition: An IOU from a government or company.  In exchange for you lending them money, they issue a bond that promises to pay you back in the future plus interest (called the "yield"). TeenAnalyst Advice: Bonds are considered to be safer investments.  Bonds issued by the government are the safest.  Bonds issued by companies are not considered risk-free because the company may go bankrupt and be unable to repay its debts.If you're a young investor, the rule of thumb is that you can be more aggressive with your investments, which means owning more stocks.  But as you grow older, you'll want...

    Bonus Share

    Bonus Share - A bonus share is free shares of certain stocks that are given to the current shareholders. Generally, this is based on the current number of shares the shareholder already has or owns. Although the free shares increase the number of shares held by the shareholder, it doesn't increase the amount of value shares held by the shareholder. This happens because although the total number of the shareholder's share have increased, the ratio of the shareholder's shares held to the number outstanding remains still remains constant; therefore, the value remains the same....

    Book Building

    Book Building - Book building is a process used to determine the price an initial public offering will be offered at. This book records the prices that the investors interested in the offering are willing to pay for each share, but when the books is closed, an underwriters, an intermediary between the issuer and the investor who is usually an investment bank, will analyze all the information recorded and the values the investors are willing to pay. This determines the issue price that will be available when the shares are listed for sale. By doing it this way, it is...

    Book Inventory

    Book Inventory - The book inventory is the available stock on hand at the time the stock is accounted for, and in balance with what is recorded in the accounting book. In large companies, the actual inventory counted and the actual book value may differ or be out by a bit, as very often, the large corporations find it very difficult to keep an exact record of what stock is on hand at any given time. Keeping book involves keeping a continuous record of stock on hand against what is available for purchase; therefore bigger companies are often out by...

    Book Shares

    Book Shares - Book shares are certain mutual funds that are recorded and maintained on the transfer agent's, who is an agent employed by a specific mutual fund or corporation to record and maintain the shareholders records including sales, purchasing, and balances recording forms. The transfer agent is responsible to record the stock market certificates that have not yet been issued into his records. These are often called uncertified shares. By completing this information, you get a better understanding of the company's financial condition. So, when joint stock shares of any company change owners during general market trades, these are...

    Book to Market Ratio

    Book to Market Ratio - The book to market ratio is a specific stocks value on the book divided by that specific stock's value on the market. The book value of a specific stock is calculated using the company's balance sheet, and the market value of any stock is the value based on the price of the specific stock. If the ratio of the stock is above one, then that stock is considered to be potentially an undervalued stock, but if the ratio of the stock is below one that stock is considered to be potentially an overvalued stock. Technology...

    Book Value

    Book Value - The book value is the common stock equity of a company according to the value that appears on the balance sheet, which is the equivalent of the total assets less its liabilities, intangible assets like goodwill, and preferred stock. This formula provides you with the value the company has in assets if the company were to go out of business at any given time, or immediately. Being as companies are expected to grown and generate additional profits in the future, the market capitalization is greater than the book value for the majority of companies. Book value is...

    Book Value Per Share

    Book Value Per Share - The book value per share is calculated based on the book value of a company, which is then divided by out many shares the company has outstanding. The book value is the company's stock equity recorded on its balance sheet by taking its total assets less all its liabilities, preferred stock, and intangible assets. When a company cannot pay its bills, has to liquidate, or ends up in receivership or bankruptcy, this is helpful information and provides the creditors with what money is left to pay them out. Creditors are paid out in specific order...

    Borrowed Stock

    Borrowed Stock - Borrowed stock is stocks that are found in a short sale that a short seller obtains on loan from a broker, usually his or her own broker, and then has to sell in the open market. There is a fair risk to this type of activity, as this strategy may find that the price of the stocked borrowed from the broker could rise in the stock market. This could result in the short seller having to purchase the stock at a much higher price then he or she sold it for, which means taking a loss on...

    Borsa Italiana

    Borsa Italiana - Borsa Italiana is Italy's main financial stock exchange which is located in Milan, Italy. This stock exchange officially opened on January 16, in the year 1808. The Borsa Italiana trades mainly in stocks, derivatives, and bonds. A derivative is a financial instrument whose value depends on the underlying value of a bond, commodity, currency, or equity. Derivatives are often called futures or options. The Borsa Italiana became private in 1997 and then was bought out in 2007 by the London Stock Exchange. It main index is the MIB 30, which is a market capitalized-weighted index of Italy's...

    Boston Stock Exchange

    Boston Stock Exchange - The Boston Stock Exchange is also known as the BSE and is a stock exchange, regional, that is based in Boston, Massachusetts. This stock exchange trades mainly in stocks which are traded on the Nasdaq, AMEX, and the NYSE. The Boston Stock Exchange, opened for trading in 1834 and is the third oldest exchange in the United States. Approximately 125 different stocks and securities are traded directly, or in conjunction with other stock exchanges, on the Boston Stock Exchange. The Boston Stock Exchanged linked to the Montreal Stock Exchange in 1984 and became the first American...

    Break-Even Time

    Break-Even Time - Break-even time is how much time is required for a discounted cash flow of a specific investment to equal the original purchase cost of that specific investment. As a general rule, the more time it takes for the specific investment to break-even, the higher the risk is on that specific investment since it will require a longer period of time for the owner of the specific investment to recoup his or her entire investment's purchase price. In the stock market, the longer an investment takes to reach the break-even point, the more risk the investor is said...

    Breakaway Gap

    Breakaway gap - The breakaway gap is considered a gap in the moving price of a specific security, which generally happens just before there is a significant new trend that takes place in the stock market or stock exchange. Stocks and securities are charted in most stock markets and exchanges; therefore when looking at the stock or securities' chart you can watch the movement that takes place on a specific stock or security. The breakaway gap is the gap that takes place in the price of the specific stock or security that results in a shift to the bullish or...

    Breaking the Buck

    Breaking the Buck - A decline below one dollar in the share amount of a money market fund is the breaking the buck phrase. A money market fund share amount may break a dollar if a key component decline happens in the value of the securities owned by the fund. For example, a shareholder borrowing may default on commercial paper held by a fund. Federal regulators projected tightening rules for money-market mutual funds that will require them to hold a reserve of assets that easier to sell and to invest only in the highest quality securities. The funds of financial...

    Breakpoint

    Breakpoint - For mutual funds it is the point the amount authorized reduces sales charge called the breakpoint. Every mutual fund may have multiple breakpoints, the larger the investment, the greater the discount. The actual reduction in the amount of sales charged is the breakpoint discount. It is a term used to refer to the offering of breakpoint discounts. The increasing level of purchases of shares in a mutual fund that is required before an individual purchaser can qualify for a reduced sales commission. The practice of petitioning mutual fund purchases just below the breakpoint considered unethical and in violation...

    Breakpoint Sale

    Breakpoint Sale - This is the sale of mutual funds at a set dollar value allowing the holder of funds to move into a lower sales charge bracket. If, at the time of venture, an investor is unable to come up with the funds needed to qualify for the lower fee, a written letter of intent is to promise to reach the total amount, or breakpoint, in a set time period. Any sales that happen just below a breakpoint are considered unethical and in violation of rules. A breakpoint sale would be when a shareholder plans to invest in a...

    Brent Crude Oil

    Brent Crude Oil – Brent crude oil is a term for identifying oil coming from the North Sea.  Brent crude is the largest of many major classifications of oil, and is used a lot as a benchmark on setting oil prices... Brent cued consists of several different blends of oils, such as forties,,opec ,  reference, light, sweet, and ecofisk.  The name Brent originated  from the Shell UK exploration policy, which named all their oil fields after birds.. in the case of Brent Crude oil , it was named after the Brent goose...

    Bricks and Mortar

    Bricks and Mortar – bricks and mortar is a term  describing the physical presence of a business.  A Bricks and mortar  business  has a physical building ,and serves consumers from an actual physical ( brick and mortar) location.  Its counter part would be a remote, mailing, or internet business.  A brick and mortar business has an actual building and serves the consumer from that physical location.  Most brick and mortar business have a storefront and their assets come from the inside the building , such as a retail store, that sells goods, or services., and  relies on its products  for...

    Broad-Base Index

    Broad-base Index - The broad-base index is an index whose only purpose is to show how the entire market is performing, such as the Wilshire 500, the S & P 500, the AMEX Major Market Index, and the Value Line Composite Index. All stock markets and stock exchanges have varying broad-base indices with different approaches to guarantee that the index used captures the entire span of the market's activity. Each is usually based on their best companies and industry offered in their markets or exchanges, which are recorded and can be measured using various formulas to calculate their capitalization....

    Broad Tape

    Broad Tape - The broad tape is expanded type of ticker tape, which provides all types of stock information and news, as well as information about stock prices. This type of ticker tape, in the expanded form, is generally shown in various brokerage firms, but generally is not shown on the trading floor of any stock markets or stock exchanges. The stock market's ticker tape provides information such as the provided quote and volume of each transaction that takes place on the major stock exchanges, which is more valuable for all...

    Broken Lot

    Broken Lot - A broken lot occurs when you have less than one hundred shares of a stock or security, or less than ten shares of infrequently or low volume stocks or securities traded. Because of this low volume, some brokerages charge much higher commissions when these types of transactions take place, which generally consists of about one-eight of a point per share and referred to commonly as the differential, which is charge on odd lot or uneven lot, shares of stocks and securities. This has the exact opposite effect as that of a round lot, which is the normal...

    Broker

    Definition: A broker is a person an investor goes to when they want to buy or sell a stock. Advice: Because shopping for stocks isn't quite as easy as, say, shopping for groceries, investors need a broker of some sort to execute their orders.  ...

    Broker Recommendation

    Broker Recommendation - A broker recommendation is the expressed opinion provided to a broker's clients about whether a stock is worth purchasing or not. On Wall Street, thousands of these brokers also called analysts who are in charge of issuing reports as well as broker recommendations on specific stocks. Typically, these analyst look at a company's basic fundamentals, building a financial model, so they can project future trends, or earnings about that company. From these projections, they issue broker recommendations as to how well they think that company's stock will do and whether the stock should be purchased or sold,...

    Brussels Stock Exchange

    Brussels Stock Exchange - The Brussels Stock Exchange, also known as the BSE, is a stock exchanged that officially opened in the year 1801 in Brussels, Belgium by a Napoleonic decree, which is a ruling or order of the court. In the year 2000, the Brussels Stock Exchange merged with a group of other stock exchanges to form the Euronext N.V., which is a European exchange for stocks and derivatives that also merged with the NYSE, New York Stock Exchange in 2007 to form the New York Stock Exchange Euronext, which allows foreign...

    BSE Sensex

    BSE Sensex - The BSE Sensex is also known as the Bombay Stock Exchange Sensitive Index, which is based on a value-weighted stock market index that tracks and records the performance of the thirty largest stocks that are traded on the Bombay Stock Exchange. The 30 largest stock are selected at random times, if the market has changed significantly enough to warrant such changes, and these stocks are chosen based on the value of shares that are free floating. The BSE Sensex track only a small percentage of the entire...

    B Shares

    B Shares - B shares refers to one of the classifications referring to stocks or mutual funds. The structure of these B shares is known as a back end load structure, which means the sales charges and commission fees will have to be paid only when the investor sells the class B shares. The idea behind a back end load is to discourage investors from selling their shares. Class B funds normally have higher management expense ratios than shares which are charged front end and in the same family. Fund companies attempt to increase their profits in back end loading...

    Bubble Theory

    Bubble Theory - The bubble theory is based on the theory that security prices will periodically rise way above what their fundamental values may be, until at some time, the bubble that is rising, burst, and the security's price will drop like a rock, quickly. This theory is based upon the inflationary universe theory and was developed as a method to track inflationary independence, which in itself is an extension of the Big Bang Theory. This theory surmises that anything that goes up must come down and that since it is gravity assisted on the way down, it falls quicker...

    Bulk Segregation

    Bulk Segregation - Bulk Segregation is stock owned by clients, but kept in the street name, which means the securities are being held in a specific brokerage for a specific client or customer and it is usually done to facilitate transactions, on a sub sequential basis. It should be noted that bulk segregation stock is kept separate from all stocks, which are owned by the brokerage firm and have no value to the brokerage firm, as the customer or client owns them. They are providing secure storage for quick trades....

    Bulletin Board

    Bulletin Board Stock - Bulletin board stock is a kind of stock, which is not traded, in any standardized stock exchange. Usually, this is due to the fact that they are unable to meet the stock market or stock exchange's specific requirements. This also happens as a result of a company filing for bankruptcy, or sometimes because the company is still growing and is unable to meet the requirements established by the stock market or stock exchange for company's shares to be purchased, sold, or traded. This frequently happens when a company has not reached a certain potential that was...

    Bull Market

    Definition: A bull market is a market in which the prices of stocks are rising.  This is generally a period of great optimism.  Someone who is optimistic about the market is called "bullish".  It got its name because when a bull attacks, it throws its horns up in ...

    Bull Trap

    Bull Trap - A bull trap is sign recognized on the stock market or stock exchange that indicates that a stock or security may be changing direction, or reversing it's path, and that the stock in question is starting to rise instead of fall, but really, the security still continues to fall even after the sign is seen. This is viewed as a trap because people have a tendency to see the sign as a preview to greater return and purchase additional stocks or securities, only to watch them plummet becoming trap with a underperforming stock or security that is...

    Bursa Malaysia

    Bursa Malaysia - Bursa Malaysia is a stock exchanged located in Malaysia where equities, derivatives, and other financial securities are trade on a daily basis. The Bursa Malaysia originally opened and was known as the Singapore Stockbroker's Association after being established in the 1930s. After Singapore separated from Malaysia to create its own currency, and government, Singapore Stockbroker's Association changed and evolved to include a couple different names and forms which include Kuala Lumpur Stock Exchange, also known as KLSE, and then evolving into its present form to become...

    Business Day

    Business Day –  a business day  is the time frame that most businesses, operate. The most common time frame for a business work day would be from 9am to 5 pm.  This is a standard time and would vary depending on the type of business,  and location..  Primarily the term “business day” indicates  a general time , for instance an 8 hour period of time, even though the business may be open longer.  Normally 5 pm is the basic , end of business time, when it comes to office hours, even though the business may be still open...

    Business Ethics

    Business Ethics -  business ethics are rules and standards  of  a business unrelated to normal business policies but focus on the moral part of operating a business.. Honesty to the employees ,investors or customers is a prime example of a business ethic.  Other examples of business ethics would be, providing a safe environment for the employees and customers, environmental concerns,  not tolerating, racial, sexual, or religious discrimination.  The business ethics part of the company would be the ability to operate a business , make an honest profit, and balance in the moral values.....

    Business Model

    Business Model – a business model is a company’s plan on how it can become profitable, and grow. A business model usually includes its revenue, and its debts, a description of its operations, and the functions of the business.  A business model can be very simple, or it can also be very in-depth and complex. A business model dates back to the earliest days of business,. It was used substantially during the infancy of the internet , for all the dotcom businesses that needed to get recognized.. The primary objective of a business model is to explain how the business...

    Business Plan

    Definition: A plan that outlines a company that hasn't been started yet.  These plans are meant to analyze the company before it forms in order to weed out bad ideas and present good ideas.  Business plans are important for companies to get financed. TeenAnalyst Advice: If you're thinking about starting a business, be sure to write a business plan.  It'll give you a chance to figure out all the good and bad ideas about your business idea before you go ahead with it.  Many people who write a business plan realize that their business won't work out or they'll realize more...

    Business Process Outsourcing

    Business Process Outsourcing -  a business process outsourcing is the practice of contracting out work to outside business to reduce costs.. A business processing  (BPO) sometimes contracts a portion or a specific function of their business, to an outside source, for  the purpose of saving money, insurance reasons, or  in some cases, to reduce the work load..  Sometimes office jobs are outsourced ,such as accounting, or customer service, known as back office outsourcing.. Sometimes service business will outsource work , such as a floor company may sell the flooring but outsource the installation to a contractor...

    Business Record

    Business Record -  a business record is  a stored document containing information about the company.. A business record includes information about meetings, the minutes,  memos that were given to employees , bills to the company , any purchases or other costs  to the company.  A business record is a great source for reviewing past  meetings, and  past business concerns and events. A business record must be made easily available and not contain any gaps in time, to provide an honest and accurate source of information..  Most companies have a retention period for a business record, either for legal or internal...

    Business Risk

    Business Risk - A business risk is any risks, which are associated to a unique set of circumstances that take place in an particular business, company, or corporation, that may affect the price that the company's securities are sold for. In business risk management, a financial risk is when a company must cover a financial effect that is unexpected and causes losses experienced within the company. The risk associated can be widely spread across the company's income statement and be affected by increased liabilities or decreasing assets or profit. ...

    Business Segment Report

    Business Segment Report – a business segment report is a disclosure of certain aspect of a business normally provided to upper management in order to gain a vision for the company..  A business segment report usually has a strategic formula and also information about competitors.. The  three segments that a business segment contains are  income, assets, and depreciation..  This source of information makes it easy to compare companies by performance , and is a good tool to use when it comes to strategy for the future.  The report also contains information on any subsidiaries that might be involved, such as...

    Business to Business

    Business to Business – business-to-business is a term used to describe a transaction which occurs between two companies.  The transaction may be  a trade of goods or service,  but it never has to do with a consumer, it only affects the two businesses.  A business-to-business (B2B) transaction  is similar to a wholesale transaction whereas a wholesaler sells to a retailer, or a brick and mortar business. A B2B could be two retailers, or two wholesalers, and any combination.  A lot of E commerce businesses  practice B2B  and also jointly sell to retailers, increasing their customer traffic...

    Business to Consumer

    Business to Consumer -  business-to-consumer is a transaction that occurs between a business ( company or corporation) and a consumer .This transaction usually is an exchange of a service, or product, for cash. .  The best example of a business-to-consumer is  Wal-Mart ( representing  the business) , and the customer would be anyone entering the store. The business-to-consumer is also known as a B2C, and its counter part is a B2B ( business-to-business)   Some business-to consumers are brick and mortar retail shops, but  many  are e-commerce  businesses who sell a service or product  over the internet....

    Busted Convertible

    Busted Convertible - A busted convertible is a security, in the form of a bond, debenture, or preferred stock that can be exchanged at the discretion of the holder for a common stock from an issuing corporation, whose market price of common stock is extremely low which makes the convertible feature nearly worthless, and not worth considering. When this occurs these busted convertible securities trade as if they are fixed income securities or investments, which are also known as fixed income equivalent. Many investors prefer fixed income investments during times when the inflation is low, although their worth decays when...

    Buy-Sell Agreement

    Buy-Sell Agreement - A buy-sell agreement is an agreement used by companies to sell the portion of a company that was owned by someone who is deceased to all the partners that remain alive, at a predetermined price, or by using a formula that has been predetermined. Sometimes this is called a business will and is often recommended by business specialists and financial planners to ensure that the buy-sell is a well-funded arrangement. This is a binding contract between owners are a guarantee that the company will continue to exist after an owner has passed away....

    Buy-Side Analyst

    Buy-side Analyst - The buy-side analyst works for money management corporations such as mutual funds, pension funds, trusts, and hedge funds. They are insensitive to identify investment prospects that will improve the net worth of the portfolio they work. A buy-side analyst works in a mutual fund, pension fund, or other non-brokerage firm, and provides the research and recommendations exclusively for the benefit of the company's own money managers (as opposed to individual investors). Unlike sell-side suggestions and reports buy-side recommendations are not available to anyone outside the firm....

    Buy and Hold

    Definition: The buy and hold strategy is one in which the investor buys a stock and plans to hold it for a long period of time (5 or more years).  Regardless of what happens during that time, they'll continue to hold it. TeenAnalyst Advice: One of the big mistakes that people make when they first start...

    Buy and Write

    Buy and Write - A buy and write is an investments technique where a call option that is written, in the form of a formal contract, on a financial security or asset at the same time it is purchased. A call option is a contract, in formal form, between an option seller called the optioner, and an option buyer, called the optionee gives the optionee the chance with no obligation to buy a specific financial instrument at a specific price called an exercise price on or before the option's expiry date. Investors...

    Buy Break

    Buy Break - A buy break is an investment strategy that some investors use to gauge when to buy a stock. The investor believes that when a stock passes a certain resistance level, which is an inability for a stock to increase past a certain level, that they have calculated to be so during a technical analysis of the stock. Once the stock has surpassed this level, it is believed to be an indication that the stock will most likely continue to increase and therefore it should be an extremely smart...

    Buying Climax

    Buying Climax - A buying climax is a situation in which the price of a financial instrument or a stock commodity quickly skyrockets upwards and then tumbles down. The rapid rise in the stock or financial instrument is initialized when a number of buyers, in high volume, at a price increase purchase the stock. This action can trigger a drastic and quick fall in the stock's price due to their being no more investors willing to buy the stock at such a high price, creating what goes up, must come down situation. This situation is very volatile for investors....

    Buy On The Bad News

    Buy On The Bad News - A buy on the bad news is an investment technique where an investor purchases or invests in a company's stock quickly after hearing negative news or publicity about the specific company. People who believe in this technique are under the impression that bad news or negative news will decrease the value of the company's stock. Therefore, making the company's stock undervalued and a good time to buy, as the next time the company has good news or positive news release that stock will increase in...

    Buy Order Imbalance

    Buy Order Imbalance - A buy order imbalance generally occurs around one hour before the stock market is scheduled to close, after there is late breaking news that prompts many investors to buy a large number of securities. When a buy order imbalance occurs, information on this imbalance is distributed quickly by the exchanges and other media sources in an attempt to try to minimize any disparity that may be caused. Although in extreme situations, trading is often halted altogether on the specific security that is in question, and the market...

    Buy Side

    Definition: The buy side is a side of Wall Street that represents institutional investors that are managing securities as investments.  A buy side analyst is someone who works for one of these institutions and makes recommendations to buy or sell...

    Buy Signal

    Buy Signal - A buy signal is an event, condition, or maybe an occurrence that take place and may indicate that a certain financial instrument's value may increase sometime in the near future. This buy signal tells many investors, who believe in this theory, that it may be a great time to purchase or to invest in a particular security. This buy signal practice is commonly used and studied as part of Forex trading. As a rule, if the investor buys and the signal is wrong, they are locked into an undervalued security until the market changes and the price...

    Most Popular Articles
    Most Popular Definitions
     
    Daily Definition

    Definition of the Day Distribution Plan

    Distribution Plan - a distribution plan is a plan executed by mutual fund companies. The purpose of the plan is too collect and assesses fees to shareholders of the funds, to offset expenses. The expenses could be for advertising costs or sales incentives (rewards for good behavior). The distribution plan...

    read entire definition

     
     

     

     

    Home     About Us    Contact Us     Contribute     Sitemap

    A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

    Copyright © 2009 TeenAnalyst.com