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Investing Glossary - M

    What is MLP

    Master Limited Partnerships (MLP)- It’s a combination of limited partnership and public traded securities. It’s a fairly new classification of businesses similar to the Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT). Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has criteria of what qualify as MLP, usually most of MLPs are related to production , processing and transportation of coal, natural gas, and oil. Investors like MLP because like REIT, a MLP has to give most of its earning back to investors in terms of dividends. Many oil and gas companies spin their own MLP to take advantage of the liquidity of a public company while...

    Main Street

    Definition: A term given to the investing public.  "Wall Street" typically refers to the professionals, while "Main Street" is reserved for ordinary investors. Advice: If you're an investor, you're considered to be a "Main Street" investor. ...

    Majority Ownership

    Majority Ownership - Majority Ownership is the holding of fifty-one percent or more common stock, ordinary shares, giving control of the firm. However, if none of the shareholders of a firm holds a significantly high percentage of shares, the effective control is with much less than fifty-one percent of shares. It is also a majority interest. The ownership of sufficient number of a corporation is voting shares to control company policy. This is fifty percent, or less. If the other shares are widely dispersed, and not actively voted, ownership of more than fifty percent of a company is voting stock...

    Majority Shareholder

    Majority Shareholder - Majority Shareholder is a shareholder who is part of a group that controls more than half the outstanding shares of a corporation. A single shareholder who controls more than half a corporation's outstanding shares, or sometimes, one of a small group of shareholders who collectively control more than half of a corporation's outstanding shares. It is a person or conglomerate who owns 50% or more of outstanding shares in a corporation. It is buying that much interest in a corporation that gives an entity a huge amount of control. If the ownership is widely scattered, there are...

    Management Buyout

    Management Buyout - Management Buyout is when the managers and administrators of a corporation buy the controlling interest in a company from an existing shareholder. In most cases, the management will purchase all the outstand shareholders and then take the corporation private because it feels it has the expertise to grow the business better I it controls the ownership. Quite often, directors will team up with the venture capitalists to acquire the business because it is a difficult endeavor that means high growth in capital. The existing owners usually sell most, if not all, of their investment to the managers...

    Management Company

    Management Company – Any firm that specializes in the general administration of a given mutual fund. It will include the particulars needed to provide and facilitate all aspect of managing that funds needs. The extent of the services that will be available will be tailored to that given firm’s situation. This term does have a broader application to a wide variety of industries. It can relate to any situation where a firm takes over the leadership role of a given fund or enterprise. Naturally to properly manage the given fund also requires supervision of it many different aspects, which may...

    Management Fee

    Management Fee – A management fee is a charge that is assessed by a given investment manager of a specific investment fund. It is for the compensation due to said manager in return for all the time and services they have provided for overseeing the fund. Said fees are normally varied as they apply from one fund to the next. Typically they will be based on a given percentage of the assets that are being handled. Among the items that are included in the manager’s functions, which may include those who work for the person, are the paperwork necessary for...

    Management's Discussion

    Management's Discussion - Management's Discussion is when the controlling registrants must comply with all the off-balance sheet arrangements of discovery requirements in registering the statements, annual reports and the substitute or information statements that expected are to include the financial statements for their fiscal years ending on or after June. Registrants, other than small business issuers, must include the table of contractual commitments in the registration statements, the annual reports and proxy or information statements that are required to include the financial statements for the fiscal year ending in December. Registrants may freely submit with the new disclosure requirements...

    Mandatory Convertible

    Mandatory Convertible - Mandatory Convertible is the equity-linked hybrid security that automatically converts to common stock on a pre-specified date. They have become an increasingly popular means of raising capital. A firm facing a financial market we consider characterized by asymmetric information, and significant costs in the event of financial distress. The firm raises capital by issuing mandatory convertibles, or by issuing more conventional securities like straight debt, common stock, and ordinary convertibles. The probability of being distressed financially is relatively small; it issues mandatory convertibles if it faces a smaller extent of the asymmetric information, but a greater probability...

    Margin

    Definition: The use of borrowed money from a brokerage house to purchase securities.  Referred to as "buying on margin." TeenAnalyst Advice: Most margin accounts give an investor a 50% margin.  What that means is that they can buy $20,000 worth of stock for only $10,000 of their own money.  They're charged an interest on ...

    Marginable Stock

    Marginable Stock - Marginable Stock is when the brokerage agreements give the brokerage houses the ability to lend stocks to other account holders who want to sell short. Stock held in cash accounts generally are unsalable to short sellers. If you want sellers not to be able to borrow your stock, hold it in a cash account. This means your ability to borrow against the stock will be null and void. This is generally not possible because brokerages hold, for the benefit of short position customers. There are times when brokers close short to balance the books for all shares...

    Margin Creep

    Margin Creep – An approach effectively translating into a high-end, high-profit focus ONLY, first and foremost. Involves the trend and propensity of an organization or business, to only work and focus in on the very best,  most profitable products and services. This is the obvious error, as it is done, against the interests and wellbeing, of those most involved, to ensure long-term sustainability, feasibility, profitability and success. This blind-spot, scope, bias, filter and preference can easily put a business in peril. Even if the gains are incremental, small, crawling, inching and stealthily making its way, its  can just as easily...

    Margin Trading

    Margin Trading - Margin Trading is a brokerage account that allows the investors to buy securities by borrowing a portion of the purchase price. The National Association of Securities Dealers (NADD), in the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), and the lending brokerage firm, governs margin accounts. Stocks purchased in two ways. In margin account sales, the buyer pays a portion of the purchase price and the broker lends the difference. They buyer can pay the purchase price in full, or use a margin account. One procedure is margin buying in that many investors use. It allows for a better utilization...

    Marketability

    Marketability - Marketability is securities that convert easily into cash. Such securities will generally have high liquid markets allowing the security to sell at a reasonable price very quickly. Security is a fungible, transferable instrument representing financial value. Securities broadly categorized into debt securities, such as bonds and debentures, and equity securities, such as common stocks. The company or other entity issuing the security called the issuer. It is a measure of the ability of a security to buy and sell. If there is an active marketplace for a security, it has a good marketability. It is similar to liquidity,...

    Marketable Securities

    Marketable Securities - Marketable Securities is the securities easily convertible to cash because there is high demand allowing them to sell quickly. Marketable securities are the very liquid securities that can convert into currency quickly at a reasonable price. Marketable securities are liquid, as they tend to have maturities of less than one year. Furthermore, the rates at which these securities, by investors can buy and sell have little effect on their prices. Examples of marketable securities include commercial paper, Treasury bills, banker's acceptance, and other money market instruments. A marketable security is near-cash asset and recorded at acquisition cost,...

    Marketable Security

    Marketable Security - Marketable Security is the securities easily convertible to cash because there is high demand allowing them to sell quickly. Marketable security is the very liquid securities that can convert into currency quickly at a reasonable price. Marketable security is liquid, as they tend to have maturities of less than one year. Furthermore, the rates at which these securities, by investors can buy and sell have little outcome on their prices. Examples of marketable securities include commercial paper, Treasury bills, banker's acceptance, and other money market instruments. A marketable security is near-cash asset and recorded at acquisition cost,...

    Market Basket

    Market Basket - Market Basket is the reference to research that provides the retailer with information to understand the purchase behavior of a buyer. This information will enable the retailer to understand the buyer's needs and rewrite the store's layout accordingly, develop cross-promotional programs, or even capture new buyers, much like the cross selling concept. An early illustrative example for this was when one supermarket chain discovered in its analysis that customers that bought diapers often bought beer as well, have put the diapers close to beer coolers, and their sales increased dramatically. This type of analysis is an example...

    Market Capitalization

    Definition: This is the total value of all of the shares of stock.  You find it by taking the number of shares and multiplying it by the price per share. TeenAnalyst Advice: This gives you an idea of how big a company is.  Market capitalizations are further broken down into the various categories: Large cap:...

    Market Capital

    Market Capital - Market Capital is the total of all of a firm's outstanding shares, calculated by multiplying the market price per share times the total number of shares outstanding. For example, at a current price of fifty dollars for each of its twenty million shares of outstanding stock, a firm has a market capitalization of fifty dollars times twenty million or one billion dollars it is one of the criteria investors use to chose a varied portfolio of stocks, which categorize as the small, mid, and large cap. Generally large cap stocks considered the least volatile, and small caps...

    Market Conversion Price

    Market Conversion Price - Market Conversion Price called conversion parity price, price that a shareholder effectively pays for common stock by purchasing a convertible security and then exercising the conversion option. This price is equal to the market price of convertible security divided by the conversion ratio. This is the price that a shareholder agrees to negotiate for common stock. This accomplished by acquiring a convertible security and then utilizing the conversion option given. This is equal in amount to the price on the convertible divided by the conversion ratio, the number of shares that the convertible convert. Conversion parity...

    Market Cycle

    Market Cycle - Market Cycle is the periodic up and down, high and low movements that happen in all the markets. Any price that goes up comes down too. In stock markets, a market cycle said to be complete when the Standard & Poor composite index, (S&P 500) is fifteen percent above the lowest point, or fifteen percent below the highest point. The stock market cycle is a leading indicator of corporate cycles, and mirrors changing investor sentiments. The underlying forecasting is a series of repeated cycles that we form our hypothesis. It is a prediction where market highs and...

    Market Neutral

    Definition: Market neutral investing attempts to remove the market risk from their portfolios by being both long and short in a given sector. A market neutral fund may pick two similar stocks and purchase the one it feels is better and short ...

    Market Order

    Definition: An order to buy or sell a stock at the current market price.  If you are buying the stock, it is the ask price.  If you are selling the stock, it's the bid price. TeenAnalyst Advice: Stock prices move very quickly, so placing a market order gives you the least control over what price you...

    Market Overhang

    Market Overhang - Market Overhang is an examined theory stating that in certain stocks at certain times, there is a buildup of selling pressure. This arises as a combined consequence of sales and a strong wish to sell among those who still hold the stock but fear that selling it may cause further declines. Depending on the overall liquidity in the stock, a market overhand can last for weeks, months or longer. Market overhang relates to the trading in one security, but can also apply to larger areas of the market, such as an entire sector. This creates an...

    Market Risk Premium

    Market Risk Premium - Market Risk Premium is important, but the elusive parameters in finance. It is the equity premium, the market premium and the risk premium. The term market risk premium is difficult to understand because used to designate three different concepts. It is required market risk premium. It is the historical market risk premium. It is expected market risk premium. Many finance practitioners assume that the expected market risk premium is equal to the historical market risk premium and to the required market risk premium. The CAPM presuppose that the required market risk premium is equal to the...

    Market Sweep

    Market Sweep - Market Sweep is a second offering following a tender offer, allowing institutional investors to obtain a controlling interest at a price higher than the original offer. An offer of a stock allowing institutional investors and occasionally high net-worth individuals to buy a large percentage of a company's equity, usually at an price higher than previous offer of stock. Market sweeps are moderately common in takeovers. They are common in the use of an antitakeover measure. Supplementary offering made after a tender offering that allows investors to gain a controlling interest in a company by paying a higher...

    Market Tone

    Market Tone - Market Tone is an indicator of the state of the securities market, calculated by looking at trading activity, and price fluctuations to gauge how well or how poor the securities market is doing. Market tone can pressure the type of transactions that investors make when dealing securities. Concrete prices and increased trading activity usually indicate a good market tone. Waning prices and trading activity indicate a poor market tone. It is a second offering following a tender offer, allowing institutional investors to obtain a controlling interest, at a price higher than the original offer. They are fairly...

    Market Value Added (MVA)

    Market Value Added (MVA) - Market Value Added is the difference between the current marketplace value of a firm and the capital contributed by investors. If market value added is a positive, the corporation has added value. If the market value added is a negative, the corporation has destroyed value. The amount of value added needs to be greater than the corporations investors could have achieved investing in the market portfolio, adjusted for the leverage, beta coefficient, of the firm relative to the market. MVA is the attendant value of a series of EVA values. MVA is economically correspondent to...

    Marking Up or Down

    Marking Up or Down - Marking Up or Down is the trading world, the trader buys goods and services hoping to sell the goods and services for a higher yield than originally paid. The bottom line cost price, or liquid price, is the price at which the trader, or investor invests for the durable goods and services and the selling price, or liquid price he sells it. If the selling price is greater than the cost price, a profit produced. The act of a securities dealer to raise or lowering prices on certain investment options such as stocks and bonds...

    Married Put Strategy

    Married Put Strategy - Married Put Strategy is the different terms for a strategy, but the old timers refer to it as a married put strategy. Married puts strategy refers to the combination of two different purchases, that of a stock you wish to own and of a put option on the same underlying stock. The term married is because both transactions have to be simultaneously, in the same day, and you must tell your broker that the stock you must buy delivered. You cannot use the married put strategy on every stock you buy with the cost of the...

    Matched Maturities

    Matched Maturities - Matched Maturities is the funding of loans with deposits approximately equal durations to minimize interest rate risk. This is the treaty gap approach to funds management, carried out by matching maturities on opposite sides of the balance sheet in a given reporting period. All ninety-day loans matched against liabilities expected to mature or re-priced in ninety days. The disparity between maturing assets and maturing liabilities is the contractual gap, which will be different for each calendar period. Matched funds get more difficult as maturities lengthen. A bank could try to fund its five-year car loans with five-year...

    Matched Order

    Matched Order - Matched Order is the quality, custom imprinted items. Order assured and free artwork. Illegal manipulative technique of offsetting the buy and sell orders to create the impression of activity in a security, thereby causing upward price movement. It is the action by a specialist to create an opening price reasonably close to the previous close. When an amassing of one kind of order, either buy or sell, causes a delay in the opening of trading on an exchange, the specialist tries to find counterbalancing orders or trades long or short from his own inventory in order to...

    Material Information

    Material Information - Material Information is of interest to holders of bonds or notes issued. The information set forth in the documents accessible, but limited in scope and does not contain all material information concerning the bonds or notes, or all material information concerning the necessity to make an informed investment decision. Moreover it does not undertake and expressly disclaims any duty to continuously update material posted. The documents contained in this make forward-looking statements by using explicit vocabulary. All factors not predicted and therefore may affect future decisions, actions,...

    Material News

    Material News - Material News is prior studies indicating insider buying, selling, activity precedes positive, negative, abnormal returns that persist over relatively long horizons. Presumably, investors may benefit from knowledge of previous insider trades, consistent with this, the financial press and investment advisors frequently provide information on insider trading activity. Recent efforts to reduce incidence of insider trading based on non-public information have originated from regulatory authorities and companies. Congress has passed numerous new laws regulating insider trading. It investigates economist's opinions on insider trading. It investigates with a special...

    Maturity

    Definition: When referring to bonds, it's the length of time that you have to wait until you get your money back. TeenAnalyst Advice: This is the date the borrower has to repay the lender the principal (amount borrowed before interest). Bonds with maturity dates in the very near future (a year or so) typically pay...

    Maximum Capital Gains Mutual Fund

    Maximum Capital Gains Mutual Fund - This is a term that generally applies to any mutual fund that is primarily designed with the specific purpose of hopefully producing large capital gains. The focus is on small companies that an investor feels are in a growth cycle with some realistic future potential. The problem with maximum capital gains mutual funds is in the area of risk. It is often difficult to forecast the possible success of said small companies. If a wrong choice is made then naturally there will be no gain should that business prove not to actually have the...

    Median Market Cap

    Median Market Cap - Median Market Cap is funds that suddenly decide to change their investing style obviously play havoc with an investor's attempt to diversify a portfolio. You might wake up one morning to discover that you own two essentially identical funds instead of the two that balanced each other. Worse yet, research indicates most managers, there are a few exceptions among managers who concentrate on shifting asset classes to take advantage of underpriced categories. It is the midpoint of market capitalization of the stocks in a portfolio sheet. ...

    Medium-cap

    Medium-cap - Medium-cap - is a company with a market capitalization of over one billion dollars, but below the five billion dollars, a company with a market capitalization over two hundred fifty billion dollars is a giant or mega cap company. The non-existent criteria for using the market caps to classify companies, but the general rules of thumb are a micro cap company has a capitalization of below two hundred fifty million dollars. A small cap company has a market capitalization between two hundred fifty million dollars and one billion. A medium cap company has a market cap of between...

    Merger

    Definition: When one company purchases another company of an approximately similar size.  The two companies come together to become one. TeenAnalyst Advice: Two companies usually agree to merge when they feel that they can do something together that they can't do on their own. For example, AOL and Time Warner merged a few years back in hopes ...

    Who is Michael Lewis?

    Definition: Michael Lewis is a widely-known author for his books that portray what actually goes on behind the scenes on Wall Street. Advice: If you're looking for some good reads, we highly recommend you check out some Michael...

    Micro Cap

    Micro Cap - Micro Cap is a company operating under two hundred fifty million dollars. The term microcap stock applies to companies with low or ?micro? capitalizations, meaning the total value of the company or corporation's stock. Microcap companies classically have limited assets. For example, in cases where the Security and Exchange Commission suspended trading in microcap stocks, the average company had only six million dollars in net tangible assets. It clearly showed nearly half had less than one million two hundred fifty thousand bucks. Microcap stocks tend to price lower and trade lower in volume. The reliable information fares...

    Mid Cap

    Mid Cap - Mid Cap is stocks that are more risky than large cap stocks and less risky than small cap stocks. Generally, danger of company failure decreases as the company increases in size. However, a mid cap stock also has better prospective for growth. The large cap company has reached capacity. A very large company may have completely saturated the market while a mid cap company may have room to grow into a large cap company. When considering an investment in a mid cap stock, try deciding the mid cap stock in question for potential to grow into a...

    Minimum-Variance Portfolio

    Minimum-Variance Portfolio - Minimum-Variance Portfolio is the portfolio of individually risky assets that when taken together, result in the lowest possible risk level for the rate of expected return. Such a portfolio hedges each investment with an offsetting investment; the individual investor's choice on how much to offset the investments depends on the level of risk and expected return willing to accept. The reserves in a minimum variance portfolio are individually riskier than the portfolio as a whole. The names of terms come from how to mathematically express the outcome. It is the volatility replacement for the risk, and correlation...

    Minority Interest

    Minority Interest - Minority Interest is shareholders whose combined shares represent less than half of the total outstanding shares issued by a corporation have the minority interest in that corporation. In many cases, the collective holdings of the minority shareholders are considerably less than half of the total shares. In another example, in a partnership, any partner who has a smaller percentage than another partner has a minority interest. Under normal situations, it is difficult for those with a minority interest to have any real influence on corporate policy. An outside ownership interest in a subsidiary consolidated with the parent...

    Minority Ownership

    Minority Ownership - Minority Ownership is less than fifty percent ownership of a corporation voting stock, or not enough ownership to control the company operations. From a purely accounting point of view, parent company which owns less than one hundred percent, but more than fifty percent of a subsidiary presents the value of the remaining ownership, the minority ownership, on the balance sheet in a separate account. In such cases, minority interest shows as either a liability or an equity item on the consolidated balance sheet, and the income, or loss, owed to the minority owners. From the balance sheet...

    Money Market

    Definition: Money market accounts pay competitive interest rates (higher than savings accounts) in exchange for the use of your money.Advice: Money market accounts pay higher interest rates because they usually demand that you keep a higher balance.  Also, many people get these confused with CD's.  They are in fact quite different: CD's are time deposit accounts whereas money market accounts are demand deposit accounts.  This means you can take your money out whenever you choose.  ...

    Money Market Fund

    Money Market Fund – This is a form of mutual fund that has been established by legislation and exists for investors in low risk securities. Such funds are typically very appealing to those who want funds of the small risks nature. This is in contrast to those mutual funds that offer dividends with a much higher rate of return. And this reflects their nature for short term interest rates. Among the places such mutual funds are invested will include things such as commercial paper, certificates of deposit, government securities and also any other highly fluid securities with low risk....

    Money Market Investor Funding Facility

    Money Market Investor Funding Facility – The Federal Reserve Bank established the money market investor fund facility in the year 2008. It was created so offer approximately $540 billion in possible financing aid to the money market mutual fund industry. Under this program the Federal Reserve increased the liquidity and possibly the cash available to the investors in such a market. They did this through secured funding options in various channels for purchase of assets by qualified investors. Those investors eligible would include the ones who purchased US money market mutual funds. These assets have a maturity date of approximately...

    Money Market Mutual Fund

    Money Market Mutual Fund – A money market mutual fund is an open-end type of mutual fund that is specifically invested in money markets. Such funds are short term investments. They are composed of debt obligations such as certificates of deposit, Treasury bills and commercial paper. The primary aim is to preserve the principal. And this normally means only modest dividends. With these funds the Net Asset Value remains at $1. The money market mutual fund is considered to be a very liquid form of investment. Financial institutions often used such form in order to store money not presently used...

    Monopolistic Competition

    Monopolistic Competition - A monopolistic competition, simply refers to and epitomizes a market structure with many sellers, each making their own distinctive product(s), specialties. A monopoly of sorts, where they each set their own pricing/costing and determinations of how many to produce, being too small in quantities to affect other producers in the industry. Many firms are selling the same or similar products, with no significant barriers to market-entry for more or newcomers, other competitors. Products can not be substituted with one another, high supply and demand prominent and prevalent. In essence it is a common market structure , with...

    Montreal Exchange (MX)

    Montreal Exchange (MX) - Montreal Exchange (MX) is Canada's oldest stock exchange, leadership in three areas of finance. It has financial derivatives market, clearing services, and IT business. In 1975 the Montreal Exchange altered the Canadian financial surroundings by introducing stock options. Years later, it recognized a major futures market. Today, the Montreal Exchange is a true competitor on the U.S. choice market thanks to the quality of its services and its technology infrastructure. It is the first and only foreign Exchange authorized by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to manage the technical operations of a U.S. trade, the...

    Moody's

    Definition: Moody's is an independent research company that rates bonds and preferred stocks based on the risk that the issuing organization can't repay the lenders. Advice: Moody's provides a very valuable service to investors in bonds.  They do all...

    What is Morningstar?

    Definition: Morningstar is an independent research provider for individual investors and financial advisors.  The company provides research primarily on stocks and mutual funds. Advice: Morningstar is a highly-regarded company that rates stocks and mutual funds for investors.  The company...

    Morningstar Rating System

    Morningstar Rating System – This is a rating system that was created by the firm, Morningstar Inc. of Chicago. It will be used to rate open and closed-end mutual funds. And will also be used for separately managed accounts as well as exchange traded funds. This method will rank funds by a system of between one and five stars. It relies upon a risk-adjusting type of performance rating. Under this system fund will be assessed for their down-side risks, as in the case of Treasury bills. This information is available on a subscription basis and available in various forms such...

    Mortgage-Backed Certificate

    Mortgage-backed Certificate - Mortgage-backed Certificate is a certificated backed by a pool of mortgage loans. A mortgage certificate, a pass-through certificate, conveys a proportional interest in a pool of mortgage loans. The mortgage certificates issued by the Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and also by financial institutions or private mortgage conduits issuing mortgage certificates in their own name. The mortgage certificates are security for Collateralized Mortgage Obligation (CMO) bonds. The Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation and the Federal National Mortgage Association issues the mortgage certificates. Investors receive expenditure out of the interest and principal on the underlying mortgages. The growth of...

    Mortgage-Backed Security

    Mortgage-Backed Security - Mortgage-Backed Security (MBS) is a securitized interest in a pool of mortgages. Instead of paying the shareholders fixed coupons and principal, it pays out the cash flows from the pool of mortgages. The uncomplicated form of the mortgage-backed security is a mortgage pass-through. With this structure, all principal and the interest payments, less a servicing fee, from the pool of mortgages passed directly to the investors each month. A thirty year fixed rate residential mortgage makes a fixed payment each month until the maturity. Each payment represents a partial repayment of principal and interest payments from...

    Mortgage Pass-Through Security

    Mortgage Pass-Through Security - Mortgage Pass-Through Security is a security created when one or more of the mortgage holders form a collection pool of the mortgages and sell the shares or participation certificates in the pool, a pass-through. A mortgage pass-through security consists of a set of marketable shares in a portfolio of mortgages for which investors received monthly payments of both interest and principal. Normally the package secured by credit insurance (PMI) so the investors are safe from the credit risks of the individual mortgages in the portfolio. No protection provided against the cash flow and return volatility...

    Moving Average

    Definition: In technical analysis, this shows the average value of a company's stock price over a given period of time (50, 100, or 200 days). TeenAnalyst Advice: In technical analysis, investors usually look at the moving average to confirm the direction they think a stock is heading.  They also look for irregularities in this moving average. ...

    Multi-Level Marketing

    Multi-Level Marketing  - Multi-level marketing is also referred to and abbreviated as MLM in the common vernacular and industry, business circles. Some call it networking marketing, structures and strategies through compensations of advocates and sellers, endorsers, promoters and referrers. Sales hierarchies, personal purchases of the products, those of others drive the results and success of this type of business.  Relationship-referrals and word-of mouth marketing are the tools of the trade for MLM. Independent and unsalaried ‘employees’, sales-staff, distributors, associates, dealers, franchises, consultants and independent agents are commonplace).  It operates down-line or direct customer bases, selling more products, to more being...

    Multiple Capital Structure

    Multiple Capital Structure - The separation of a company's common stock into multiple classes, such as class A, and class B. The compound capital structure may also include the bond issues as well. As with the stock, there may be varying levels of bond issues involved that connected with specific projects currently in progress. Each of the bond installments may carry different types of benefits, allowing the corporation to attract a wider range of investors. This produces several levels of investment by offering shares that carry certain rewards over the ownership of other classes of the common stock. A company...

    Municipal Bond

    Definition: Bonds issued by state, municipalities, or counties.  These bonds help finance public projects (schools, highways, etc.) and are tax-free investments. TeenAnalyst Advice: People tend to like "muni's" because they're tax-free investments.  Because of this reason, they're particularly popular among people ...

    Municipal Bond Fund

    Municipal Bond Fund - a municipal bond fund is a mutual fund who strictly invests in municipal bonds. also called muni funds.. Municipal bond funds are exempt from paying federal taxes, and in some case even exempt from state taxes... Most investors that invest in mumi funds are in the higher tax bracket, so muni funds are a good choice, to avoid being taxed on the dividends.  Mona funds are debt securities that are held by state, county or local governments, usually to finance capital expenses, such as libraries airports, etc....

    Municipal Investment Trust

    Municipal Investment Trust - Municipal Investment Trust is the entities that hold a stake in the numerous municipal bonds and then sell share to the public that represent an interest in those bonds. When the municipal bonds then pay off compensation or mature, the trust passes the income on to their shareholders. Depositors can purchase and sell shares through a broker, who often charge commissions, in the secondary markets. Like mutual funds, MIT has a public offering price and a net asset value. MIT share prices can change every day, and it is important to remember that like all fixed-income...

    Muni Fund

    Muni Fund – a Muni fund is a mutual fund who strictly invests in municipal bonds.  Muni funds are usually traded by people with in the higher tax bracket because these funds are except from federal taxes... Sometimes even escape state taxes as well.  The risk in investing in Muni fund is sometime a municipality declares bankruptcy which makes them more risky then US government bonds... On the positive side,  the underlying securities of a muni fund is backed by the government  thus giving it a high credit rating, making it more desirable for investors...

    Mutilated Security

    Mutilated Security - Mutilated Security is a damaged security that prevents a person from identifying the original issuer of the security or other necessary identifying information. If a seller is seeking to transfer the mutilated security, certain steps will have to ensure the buyer that the security is able to transfer and that all rights associated with the security transfer after the sale despite being able to identify the original issuer. The certificate name of the issue, the issuer, or some other identifying detail is unreadable. A stock or bond certificate that because of irreparable damage is unable to transfer...

    Mutual Fund Custodian

    Mutual Fund Custodian – a mutual fund custodian is a bank, or any other similar financial intuition, which is responsible for safe keeping and holding the securities owned, and within a mutual fund.  A mutual fund custodian usually maintains and holds all records, sales redemptions and trades of the share holders...  A mutual fund custodian may but not always, act as the mutual fund transaction agent...  Since a mutual fund is basically a pool of several funds and not one common stock, it’s essential that a 3rd party is involved to maintain, and oversee the funds operations....

    Mutual Funds

    Definition: A mutual fund is made up of money that is pooled together by a large number of investors who give their money to a fund manager to invest in a large portfolio of stocks and/or bonds. TeenAnalyst Advice: Mutual funds are great because they offer regular investors a chance to diversify their portfolios, which is...

    Mutual Fund Share

    Mutual Fund Share - mutual fund share classes are mutual funds that are identical in product, but a have a defense in fee structure, designated by alphabetic symbol after the funds name... A class A, has a front end load (a fee at the time of the purchase of the fund), a class B share has a back end load. A back end load has a fee at the time you sell your shares.  However the longer you hold the fund, the less the fee is attached, and it will reach a point (if you keep the fund long enough)...

    Mutual Fund Symbol

    Mutual Fund Symbol - a mutual fund symbol is a five digit identification code that is assigned to every fund... The purpose of the Mutual fund symbol is to assign, and distinguish the fund from any other Mutual fund, stock bond or similar securities.  Al Mutual funds have their own personal symbol, but al mutual funds are 5 digits and all ends in the letter X.  Mutual funds generally have classes, consisting of characters ABC or D.  These letters will follow the funds symbol indenting what class the fund is...

    Mututal Fund Cash

    Mututal Fund Cash - TO ASSET RATIO - mutual fund cash –to asset ratio, is the total amount of cash held by a mutual fund company.  Some mutual fund companies keep larger amounts of cash on hand simply because the fund managers cant see find what they think are good investments, Another reason would be if the manager of the fund, just does not a good financial feeling about the stock or bond market in general, and chooses to keep the cash instead of risking it in bad times, and losing it for the funds investors....

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    Definition of the Day Backgrounder

    Backgrounder - a backgrounder is a document which contains the history of company, or a specific product...  The information in the backgrounder contain financial information, lists key personnel, goods and service information, a mission statement , and the company’s objectives The backgrounder is usually brief, and is a basic summary...

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