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Canadian Capital Gains Tax

The percent of the Canadian Capital Gain Tax is extremely high in comparison to other nations on the North American Continent. Before 1972, a capital tax was not established in Canada, but in the year 1972, Canada's federal government help introduced the Capital Gain Tax. This new tax was created with the goal of a more equitable taxation system and to help finance Canada's newly established social security system.

During the years of 1972-1988, the citizens of Canada had to pay nearly 50% of all their capital gains. In fact, Ottawa, a territory inside of Canada, wanted to use the newly established capital gain tax to remove the older inheritance tax. They were successful in that endeavor and now the capital gains tax in Canada is more well-known. Capital gains have been constantly changing over the years, and it is depended on the Canadian government needs. However, some confusion of what the Canadian Capital Gains Tax needs to be clear. This article will attempt to simplify the Canadian Capital Gain Tax.

A Capital Gain Tax is taxed based on a financial gain from a product, item, or property that is sold for more than its value of basis. However, if a taxpayer sells their item less than its value of basis, then that is considered as a capital loss. Canada's capital gains tax levies itself when the government's economic value of assets (this would include things like antique items, government bonds, tracts of land, or shares) increases in worth. However, the rates of capital gains taxes will differ from each individual and corporations.

However, there are some things that are not considered capital gain and therefore, are not taxed. The examples of some exemptions made are: registered education saving plans (RESPs), registered retirement income funds (RRIFs), the selling of a property that is used for primary residence, and registered retirement saving plans (RRSPs).

Another thing that does affect capital gains tax is the inclusion rate. The inclusion rate is what is used by capital gain tax in order to tax Canadian citizens. However, as of 2000, the Canadian government had to reduce this rate from three fourths to half. This was due in part of the government's Five-Year-Tax Reduction Plan, because previously it inclusion rates were increasing at an alarming rate.

Therefore, currently, the capital gain tax isn't as huge a burden on Canadian citizen, but there is always room for improvement.

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